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Famous Speeches of American Independence

"Will you bear with Me tonight when I say to you, is there any human problem in the world that should stand between your mighty declaration of the Truth, your Mighty Decreeing for the Truth, for the Light, for the Power and Protection of America and Her people?
Only the Cosmic Light and Its Infinite Power can save Europe now!
Oh that Europe might have as many understand this "Great Presence" as America has! Then she would have a hope, and a strong one!"

Beloved Sanat Kumara - The Voice of the "I AM" 1996:01:5

© "I AM" School, Inc. Ascended Master Pictures are © Saint Germain Foundation
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A British statesman, soldier, and writer who was twice Prime Minister of Britain. Churchill is ranked as the greatest prime minister in British history. At the time of this speech, he was serving as Minister of Munitions, and Secretary of State for War, and for the Colonies.

Winston Churchill

“The Third Great Title-Deed of Anglo-American Liberties”
Methodist Central Hall, Westminster, London.

“I move that the following resolution be cabled from the meeting as a greeting to the President and people of the United States of America: This meeting of the Anglo-Saxon Fellowship assembled in London on the 4th of July, 1918, send to the President and people of the United States their heartfelt greetings on the 142nd anniversary of the Declaration of American Independence.

They rejoice that the love of liberty and justice on which the American nation was founded should in the present time of trial have united the whole English-speaking family in a brotherhood of arms.

The Declaration of Independence is not only an American document. It follows on the Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights as the third great title-deed on which the liberties of the English-speaking people are founded. By it we lost an Empire, but by it we also preserved an Empire.

Winston Churchill
“The Third Great Title-Deed of Anglo-American Liberties”

BACKGROUND
During a Liberty Day rally in London near the end of World War I, Winston Churchill who was then Minister of Munitions for the wartime British Cabinet, was asked to address the audience gathered in the Methodist Central Hall Westminster. He gave a speech in honor of the 142nd anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. In this speech Churchill references the founding principles that tie the two nations - America and Britain - together.

HIS MOTIVATION
Churchill seeks to connect the nations together in the common struggle for freedom and liberty that they were facing.
"We are met here also as brothers-in-arms facing for a righteous cause grave injuries and perils and passing through times of exceptional anxiety and suffering. We therefore seek to draw from the past history of our race inspiration and comfort to cheer our hearts and fortify and purify our resolution and our comradeship."

THEME OF HIS SPEECH
"A great harmony exists between the spirit and language of the Declaration of Independence and all we are fighting for now. A similar harmony exists between the principles of that Declaration and all that the British people have wished to stand for."

KEY FACTS STATED IN HIS SPEECH

Churchill references the history of the principles that the Founding Fathers drew upon when debating the wording that should be used for their declaration of God-given rights.
"The Declaration of Independence is not only an American document. It follows on the Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights as the third great title-deed on which the liberties of the English-speaking people are founded."

Churchill references the history of the principles that the Founding Fathers drew upon when debating the wording that should be used  for their declaration of God-given rights.
"The Declaration of Independence is not only an American document. It follows on the Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights as the third great title-deed on which the liberties of the English-speaking people are founded."

July 4, 1918

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