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Famous Speeches of American Independence

"If you will remember the Words of Saint Germain during the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, He said, "God has given America to the Free," and the Free are those who want the Light. When Lincoln stood alone for that Freedom to be maintained, he had to face his God, and the God Powers answered him."

Beloved Godfre - The Voice of the "I AM" 1986:11:6

© "I AM" School, Inc. Ascended Master Pictures are © Saint Germain Foundation
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A lawyer, politician, and statesman who served as the 16th President of the United States. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War, defending the nation as a constitutional union, while pursuing liberty and equality for all.

Abraham Lincoln

'Address in Independence Hall'

In his short, unexpected speech, Lincoln explains the Founders' vision of Freedom and Liberty for all men held within the Declaration of Independence.

"I have often inquired of myself, what great principle or idea it was that kept this Confederacy so long together.
It was not the mere matter of the separation of the Colonies from the motherland; but that sentiment in the Declaration of Independence which gave liberty, not alone to the people of this country, but, I hope, to the world, for all future time.

It was that which gave promise that in due time the weight would be lifted from the shoulders of all men. This is a sentiment embodied in the Declaration of Independence.

Now, my friends, can this country be saved upon that basis? If it can, I will consider myself one of the happiest men in the world, if I can help to save it. If it cannot be saved upon that principle, it will be truly awful. But if this country cannot be saved without giving up that principle, I was about to say I would rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender it."

Abraham Lincoln
'Address in Independence Hall'

BACKGROUND
Less than two months before the American Civil War began on April 12, 1861, Abraham Lincoln made his inaugural journey to Washington as president-elect. He stopped at Independence Hall in Philadelphia at the hallowed site where the Declaration of Independence had been signed eighty-five years ago; whereby he proceeded to make this impromptu speech.

HIS MOTIVATION
Lincoln had previously turned to the Declaration for support in his push for equality in the form of “Liberty to all” – "the principle that clears the path for all – gives hope to all". Here he makes it clear that if the Union cannot be saved upon that principle, "it will be truly awful."

THEME OF HIS FOUR SPEECHES
Lincoln constantly drew on the Founding Fathers' vision embodied within the Declaration of Independence when promoting Liberty, Equality, Justice and Humanity for all men within the context of the threatening Civil War. "So I say in relation to the principle that all men are created equal, let it be as nearly reached as we can. If we cannot give freedom to every creature, let us do nothing that will impose slavery upon any other creature."

KEY FACTS STATED IN HIS FOUR SPEECHES

Lincoln often referred to the necessity of the 'Southern Compromise' on the slavery issue that, in in his eyes, had made the United States Constitution an imperfect 'silver frame' for the 'golden apple' portrait of equality for all men as visioned within the Declaration of Independence.

"It may be argued that there are certain conditions that make necessities and impose them upon us, and to the extent that a necessity is imposed upon a man he must submit to it. I think that was the condition in which we found ourselves when we established this government.
We had slavery among us, we could not get our constitution unless we permitted them to remain in slavery, we could not secure the good we did secure if we grasped for more, and having by necessity submitted to that much, it does not destroy the principle that is the charter of our liberties. Let that charter stand as our standard.

"The Savior, I suppose, did not expect that any human creature could be perfect as the Father in Heaven; but He said, “As your Father in Heaven is perfect, be ye also perfect.” He set that up as a standard, and he who did most towards reaching that standard, attained the highest degree of moral perfection.
So I say in relation to the principle that all men are created equal, let it be as nearly reached as we can."

Lincoln often referred to the necessity of the  'Southern Compromise' on the slavery issue that, in in his eyes, had made the United States Constitution an imperfect 'silver frame' for the 'golden apple' portrait of equality for all men as visioned within the Declaration of Independence. 

"It may be argued that there are certain conditions that make necessities and impose them upon us, and to the extent that a necessity is imposed upon a man he must submit to it. I think that was the condition in which we found ourselves when we established this government. 
We had slavery among us, we could not get our constitution unless we permitted them to remain in slavery, we could not secure the good we did secure if we grasped for more, and having by necessity submitted to that much, it does not destroy the principle that is the charter of our liberties. Let that charter stand as our standard.

"The Savior, I suppose, did not expect that any human creature could be perfect as the Father in Heaven; but He said, “As your Father in Heaven is perfect, be ye also perfect.” He set that up as a standard, and he who did most towards reaching that standard, attained the highest degree of moral perfection.
 So I say in relation to the principle that all men are created equal, let it be as nearly reached as we can."

February 22, 1861 - 'Address at Independence Hall', Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

July 10, 1858 - 'The Electric Cord Speech', Chicago, Illinois

January 1861 - 'Fragment on the Constitution and the Union', never delivered publicly

November 19, 1863 - 'The Gettysburg Address', Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

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